Chapter IX | Horror Fiction

The case for horror literature

Stephen King makes his case for the

…the horror story as both literature and entertainment, a living part of twentieth-century literature…They are books and stories which seem to me to fulfill the primary duty of literature— to tell us the truth about ourselves by telling us lies about people who never existed.”

Danse Macabre, Stephen King

What to Read Next-updated

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You know the dismal depression that follows the finishing of a fantastic story?………………Okay, now that the uncool folks have left this post, you and I can really talk.  

The below my proposed remedy to being booksick.  ‘Booksick’ does not capture it, but it’s the best I’ve got at the moment. Any ideas on what to call the bitter-sweetness of finishing an amazing books?

Nonfiction-Science

 

Chaos: Making A New Science, James Gleick

Emergence: The Connected Lives of Ants, Brains, Cities, and Software, Steven Johnson

The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood, James Gleick

Complexity:The Emerging Science at the Edge of Order and Choas, Mitchell Waldrop

Gödel, Escher, Bach: an Eternal Golden Braid, Douglas Hofstadter

Epistolary Novels (it’s a story told through a series of letters)

Perfectly Reasonable Deviations…: The Letters of Richard P. Feynman

Soul of the Age: Selected Letters of Hermann Hesse, 1891-1962, Hermann Hesse and Mark Harman

Frances and Bernard, Carlene Bauer

Dear Committee Members, Julie Schumacher

Letters of Note: An Eclectic Collection of Correspondence Deserving of a Wider Audience edited by Shaun Usher

Fiction-Life Changing

The Glass Bead Game, Hermann Hesse

The Great and Secret Show, Clive Barker

Ghost Story, Peter Straub

House of Leaves, Mark Danielewski

Philosophy-for amateurs and pros

The Confessions, St. Augustine