Loud Speakers: Watch Colors & Read Sound! “Beck – Colors” on YouTube

No rights owned. Paying homage.

All the colors.

Beck writes such innocuously infectious pop jams.

What is pop music, anyway?

Genres, huh?

Heard thru headphones Aka cans (big earmuff-lookin’ ones. Obviously.), this song is and is not the same song when it is heard through speakers.


Trying to learn about sound and light these days.

Speakers.  My parents had two floor standing ones that were about three feet tall.

They made sound.  Headphones make sounds. My portable CD player/Cassette Tape Player (deck?)/Radio made sounds.  I also took an entire battalion of d batteries if you wanted to “go mobile.”

“A boombox, in its most basic form, is composed of two or more loudspeakers, an amplifier, a radio tuner, and a cassette and/or CD player component, all housed in a single plastic or metal case with a handle for portability. Most units can be powered by AC or DC cables in addition to batteries.”

Wikipedia (per my March 01, 2019 visit) this page was last edited on 24 February 2019, at 20:24 (UTC).

Citations, huh

Hey, how they do that?

 


 

How headphones work = How speakers work = x

x = using magnetism to turn electrical energy into sound.

Speakers = loudspeakers = electric sound-making machines.

Loudspeakers attach to tiny, earbud headphones (cased inside ear muffs or earbud headphones) and make sound we hear.

Loudspeakers play back.

Loudspeakers turn electricity into sound.

Es_spk 300px-DynElement


Bosch_36W_column_loudspeaker_polar_pattern

Polar plots of a four-driver industrial columnar public address loudspeaker taken at six frequencies. Note how the pattern is nearly omnidirectional at low frequencies, converging to a wide fan-shaped pattern at 1 kHz, then separating into lobes and getting weaker at higher frequencies[50] (Wikipedia)


Stellar site! www.linkwitzlab

Testing a stereo system for accuracy

A sequence of tests is presented below that should reveal to what degree a given stereo system achieves the potential that is inherent in the 2-loudspeaker reproduction format. (See also the more recent Accuracy, spatial distortion and plausibility of the auditory scene article)

A – Pink Noise

Pink noise is a random process with a power spectrum that decreases at a 10 dB/decade or 3 dB/octave rate with increasing frequency. When measured with a 1/3rd octave analyzer, or constant Q filter bank, it has a flat frequency response. Since the critical bandwidth in hearing is approximately 1/3rd octave wide, pink noise tends to give an equal representation of all frequencies in the audio spectrum, from lows to highs. Thus it would seem to be a good auditory test signal, except that we do not have a reference for what it should sound like in an absolute sense. This limits the usefulness of pink noise to comparison tests of A versus B. Pink noise can reveal small physical differences between two sound sources, but it can be difficult to find the cause for those differences or to predict their consequences. Pink noise can drive you nuts, so be careful. Still, pink noise will point to flaws and errors in a sound system.

The tests use various 5 second combinations of L and R  streams of uncorrelated pink noise. What I call Stereo here is actually fuzzy  stereo and has no solid image, but is spatial like a cloud. In Mono the left and right tracks are identical. Left or Right means that there is sound only in one or the other track. 

Download and save pink-alternating3.wav (12 MB). Then burn the file to a CD-R for convenient access and repetition of the 1 minute  sound file.

1    Stereo = L & R 8    Mono
2    Left = L  (R = 0) 9    Stereo
3    Right = R  (L = 0) 10    Left
4    Mono = L = R 11    Right
5    Stereo 12    Mono
6    Mono 13    3 Bursts, 10 cycles @ 3 kHz, -3 dB FS
7    Stereo 14    3 Bursts, 10 cycles @ 300 Hz, -3 dB FS

 

Author: writtencasey

I am fascinated by the scientific endeavor and I read about or engage with those processes as much as possible. I am a compulsive reader and writer. With a background in anthropology and as an arm-chair/backyard scientist, I hope to improve my writing skills and learn about any areas of weakness or misunderstanding in my analytic skills. I am excited to share. Thank you for spending time here. Please reach out if you are so inclined. I'd be excited to hear from you.

4 thoughts on “Loud Speakers: Watch Colors & Read Sound! “Beck – Colors” on YouTube”

    1. A’yup. I deleted half of the work I did on the initial ‘publish.’ I am a bit of a spazz with computers. Ha.
      But just when I thought all was lost, I see a blue History hyperlink! Hazaa. Recovered.

      Like

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