Watch “INXS – Never Tear Us Apart” on YouTube

A recent conversation left me reexamining my mental (re)collection of the 1980’s music scene. I came from an acoustic, Martin, early 1960’s to gritty 1970’s household, ya see.

Now, I was a young `un during the `80s, not even alive for the full decade. I write from sloppy memory & unresearched timelines.


To wit. viz. My first memories of favorite songs (years before-gasp-receiving my first cd/tape player boombox) include:

1. Phil Collins (solo, post Genesis); Groovy Kind of Love

2. The Beach Boys (see Surf’s Up not Pet Sounds. Giggle); Kokomo

3. Don Henley (solo, stag de La Eagles); All She Wants to do is Dance


My radio cassette player allowed me to record radio to cassette tape. I took great advantage of such a Tape OP.


The draped-on drum production kinda kills me.

Insta-musical carbon dating.

Not necessarily standing the test of time.

Remaining revolutionary.

But hindsight blahblahblah.


I know I’ll take Tears for Fears, INXS, and George Michael (see also The New Radicals 1990’s) most days.

But I thought real hard about what song with which to start a Pressed review.

The 1980’s have some spectacular introductory pieces (ala Fleetwood Mac’s The Chain).

Songs that mesmerize you before they truly begin.

Donnie Darko previously re-popularized Tears for Fears Head Over Heels. Same band, Sowing the Seeds of Love continued a pop sentiment that trickled down to Oasis, Space Hog. REM.


But, as far as knock out 1980’s intros that I can immediately recall, I had to land here with INXS. Vaguely Antish?


P.s. an exemplar par excellence of the use of a 1980’s sax. Too often wrecking a track.

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Poly-sal’ went acourtin’: Orientation Day

The tradition of Courtly Love in literature comes in three types: allegories, lyricals, and romance (aka færy tales).

In prudence of full disclosure, be aware that Richard Wagner’s opera was tentatively titled Parzifal (just as WOLFRAM VON ESCHENBACH had titled the protagonist) until 1877, when he switched to the handle Parsifal. This change was informed by one theory about the origin and etymology of the name (Perceval > Parzifal > Parsifal).

Vidēre licet the name as of Persian order Fal (Pure) Parsi (Fool).

At this time, your historian has been unable to validate any other origin theories for the name.


Though we shall encounter, virtually, every story ever told within Parzifal, a breakdown of the tradition of Courtly Love and Chivalry during the High Middle Ages as Eschebach tells it is justly prudent.

We concern ourselves, as the reader, with (1) Provençal troubadours, (2) French trovères, and (3) minnesänger.

I’m Wolfram von Eschenbach. I’m a bit of a minnesänger.

Note that Eschenbach states that a Provençal called Kyot (my research suggest Pyot to be a correspondant name in other texts) sent ” the book” to him.

Of keen interest to your historian is the patron enabling Eschenbach to afford the luxury of his composition. Wolfram was under the patronage of Medieval German Mæcenas Herman Landgrave of Thuringia.


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The tradition of Courtly Love and Chivalry during the High Middle Ages as seen from the Critical perspective:

The overall gist, to be concisely reductive) of works concerned with courtly love seems to be the romance of self-perfection in knighthood, where both the chivalric and the spiritual receive their due as part of Love and Sensualism.

Parzifal had the knowledge of chivalry concealed from him until he was of an age able to think for himself.

In C.S. Lewis’ Allegory of Love, he presents the literary tradition of courtly love to include four basic characteristics: humility ; courtesy ; adultery ; Religion of Love.

A feudalization of love.

We will consider the meaning of the above shortly.

The genius of the above description will be revealed in history of words.