The girl who dogged… — WrittenCasey

She flit and she drove them and him mad, both equal and in tirn, Though those who would tell her herself to her face, only elicited her giggles, and quickly jumps ‘ere, with discomfort tempered in and with unconditional love. She loved man by his his touch. Effortlessly and yet also endlessly. His confusion at […]

via The girl who dogged… — WrittenCasey

From Tilopa, THE SONG OF MAHAMUDRA

Though words are spoken to explain the Void,

The Void as such can never be expressed.

Though we say, “The Mind is a bright light,”

It is beyond all words and symbols.

Although the mind is void in essence,

All things it embraces and contains.

Made

You shall make it utterably Swift because I am inexorable, unyielding, and relentlessly

Merciful.

I feel you like a swift breeze across my brow, made apparent only through the

Perspiration of my effort under intent.

I do naught but believe that I will not go against myself.

I submit. I am love.

AEm Written.

Tolle lege. Anon, anon.

You see Eve, and/or Lilith.

But I’m Helen Estelle and Alice Ladder

Give.

Chapter IX | Horror Fiction

The case for horror literature

Stephen King makes his case for the

…the horror story as both literature and entertainment, a living part of twentieth-century literature…They are books and stories which seem to me to fulfill the primary duty of literature— to tell us the truth about ourselves by telling us lies about people who never existed.”

Danse Macabre, Stephen King

matter and/or matter of fact

 

We have to ask ourselves whether, in any sense at all, there is such a thing as matter…It we cannot be sure of the independent existence of objects, we shall be left alone in a desert–it may be that the whole outer world is nothing but a dream, and that we alone exist. ..there is no logical impossibility in the supposition that the whole of life is a dream, in which we ourselves create all the objects that come before us.  But although this is not logically impossible, there is no reason whatever to suppose that it is true; and is no reason whatever to suppose that it is true.

    Bertrand Russell

A Quote to Find the Rabbit Hole

“Zeno’s arguments, in some form, have afforded grounds for almost all theories of space and time and infinity which have been constructed from his time to our own.”

Recalled via Boyer, Carl B. The History of the Calculus and its Conceptual Development. New York: Dover Publications, Inc., 1959. Previously published under the title, The Concepts of the Calculus